The Strange World of Dry Needling

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The Strange World of Dry Needling

Kylee Nowling, Staff Writer

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Dry needling is a controversial practice used by many physical therapists. A dry needle is one that does not have medication in it. The dry needles are inserted through the skin and into the muscle in this technique. Dry needling is used to treat pain and movement impairments.

Dry needling is legal in 30 states, but is still prohibited in many others. The debate comes from acupuncturists. Acupuncturists claim that dry needling is acupuncture, but with a different name. Although there are similarities, dry needling is definitely not acupuncture. They also claim that physical therapists performing dry needling are not trained and could injure the patients, but this could not be farther from the truth. In the states where it is legal, physical therapists are trained to dry needle, and it is safe to have it done. Dry needling could help many people, but is illegal throughout some of the U.S.

My person experience with dry needling was amazing. I had a small tear/damage in my left quadricep, and had tried many different methods of healing that were unsuccessful. My physical therapist decided to start dry needling along with stretching and home remedies on my leg. Although it could be quite painful, dry needling helped heal my muscle quickly. The needles were able to get blood back into the injured areas to promote healing. I am now onto strengthening my leg, and will be able to get back onto the soccer field. If it wouldn’t have been for dry needling, my leg may have not healed properly.

I think it is important that all states look at dry needling with an open mind, and start to consider legalizing it everywhere. So many people could be put out of pain by this practice.